Emerging Markets Articles, Research, & Case Studies on Emerging Markets– HBS emerging markets articles Working Knowledge
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Emerging Markets Articles, Research, & Case Studies on Emerging Markets– HBS emerging markets articles Working Knowledge
Drawing on 110 interviews with business leaders as part of the Creating Emerging Markets project at Harvard Business School, this paper represents the first systematic attempt to identify and compare investment in education across emerging economies, specifically in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Turkey, and the Persian Gulf between the 1960s and the present day. This paper examines how strategies by Western multinational enterprises in emerging markets over the last century have been shaped by context. These strategies evolved from resolving logistical challenges to managing assertive governments. More recently the focus has been to locate activities in the lower end of global value chains, whilst responding to local competitors. How did a world-class coffee region arise out of a land once decimated by smallpox and measles? Casey Lurtz discusses the rise of a coffee economy in a desolate region of Mexico. Open for comment; 0 Comments. How can multinationals, entrepreneurs, and investors identify and respond to new challenges and opportunities around the world? In this Q&A, HBS professors and strategy experts Tarun Khanna and Krishna G. Palepu offer a practical framework for succeeding in emerging markets. Plus: Book excerpt with action items. Key concepts include: The ambition level of large, fast-growing emerging markets around the world rivals that of companies in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Khanna and Palepu outline how to identify and respond to institutional voids in product, labor, and capital markets. Investors and entrepreneurs can respond to niches in institutional infrastructure in the private sector, such as the need for information analyzers and advisors, aggregators and distributors, transaction facilitators, and more. A useful starting point for managers is to construct an institutional map to identify institutional voids—which may themselves present business opportunities. Western multinational companies as well as local entrepreneurs are innovating products to attract the emerging middle class. Such innovations could potentially benefit consumers living in mature markets. Closed for comment; 0 Comments. Going global is one thing, targeting emerging economies quite another. In this collection from our archives, HBS faculty discuss strategy development, government relations, exploiting local opportunities, and risk management when dealing in emerging economies. Closed for comment; 0 Comments.
This study shows how perceptions of political risk by business leaders in emerging markets have differed between regions. For Latin Americans, macroeconomic and policy turbulence were the biggest sources of risk. For South Asians, excessive bureaucracy was the biggest source of risk. The study is based on a unique Harvard Business School oral history database. Emerging markets are contending with a worrisome slowdown in economic growth accompanied by the build-up of corporate debt. Understanding this and other potential vulnerabilities requires knowing more about the state of emerging market corporate balance sheets, the drivers of debt accumulation, and the effects of both on the macroeconomy. Filter Results : emerging markets articles Arrow Down Arrow Up Popular Browse All Articles About Us Newsletter Sign-Up RSS Popular Browse All Articles About Us Newsletter Sign-Up RSS Emerging Markets → New research on emerging markets from Harvard Business School faculty on issues including strategy development, government relations, exploiting local opportunities, history, and risk management when dealing in emerging economies. Page 1 of 14 Results 13 Nov 2020 Working Paper Summaries Long-Run Returns to Impact Investing in Emerging Markets and Developing Economies by Shawn Cole, Martin Melecky, Florian Mölders, and Tristan Reed Examination of every equity investment made by the International Finance Corporation, one of the largest and longest-operating impact investors, shows this portfolio has outperformed the S&P 500 by 15 percent. Giving women in rural India more control over household finances reduces the social stigma of working, says research by Natalia Rigol. Open for comment; 0 Comments. Emerging Markets Articles, Research, & Case Studies on Emerging Markets– HBS emerging markets articles Working Knowledge
Emerging Markets Articles, Research, & Case Studies on Emerging Markets– HBS emerging markets articles Working Knowledge
HBS Home About Academic Programs Alumni Faculty & Research Baker Library Giving Harvard Business Review Initiatives News Recruit Map / Directions Working Knowledge Business Research for Business Leaders Browse All Articles Popular Articles Cold Call Podcasts About Us Leadership Marketing Finance Management Entrepreneurship All Topics... Topics COVID-19 Entrepreneurship Finance Gender Globalization Leadership Management Negotiation Social Enterprise Strategy Sections Book Cold Call Podcast HBS Case In Practice Lessons from the Classroom Op-Ed Research & Ideas Research Event Sharpening Your Skills What Do You Think? Working Paper Summaries Browse All Cold Call A podcast featuring faculty discussing cases they've written and the lessons they impart. Subscribe on iTunes 07 Sep 2021 Cold Call Podcast How to Lead through a Merger: US Airways and American Airlines In February 2013, US Airways announced that it would merge with American Airlines to create the world’s largest airline. During the acquisition integration process, CEO Doug Parker had to determine how best to combine the two airlines’ core systems, operating processes, and leadership teams, as well as the appropriate scope and speed of strategic changes. Parker knew that his choices would send important signals to employees, customers, and competitors. Harvard Business School senior lecturer David Fubini discusses how Parker approached those decisions in the case, Merging American Airlines and US Airways.  Open for comment; 0 Comments. Oral history is a valuable resource to explore how businesses developed and functioned in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, regions with a growing share of global economic activity and the majority of the world’s population. While oral history is not uncritical, it provides openings for opinions, voices, and judgements on events on which there was often silence. Why are some firms able to persistently survive challenging, uncertain, and underdeveloped business environments? To address this question, the authors utilize the HBS Creating Emerging Markets project―a novel collection of in-depth, publicly available video interviews conducted by HBS researchers with leaders of emerging market firms that have survived over decades and even centuries. Analyzing these interviews for the first time, the authors theorize that firm reputation is a key strategic driver, and outline how a favorable reputation allows a firm to more fully utilize its existing resources by decreasing uncertainty. They also show that reputation has offensive and defensive properties that make it valuable during both positive and negative economic cycles. Finally, the authors propose new ideas about how reputation facilitates survival and discuss why a reputation-based source of competitive advantage is hard to imitate. This paper argues that there are important commonalities about the business history of countries across Africa, Asia, and Latin America despite differences between countries and within regions of each country. It is possible to discern a distinctive body of scholarship different from that on the West. how did the stock market doing today